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George E. Axtelle papers

Overview

Scope and Contents

Biographical Note

Adminstrative Information

Detailed Description

Correspondence

University Papers

American Humanist Association

Publications


George E. Axtelle papers, 1924-1974 | Southern Illinois University Special Collections Research Center

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Collection Overview

Title: George E. Axtelle papers, 1924-1974Add to your cart.

ID: 3/RG 4/FP16-3-F1

Primary Creator: Axtelle, George E. (George Edward), (1893-1974)

Extent: 8.0 Cubic Feet

Arrangement: Arranged in 3 Series: (1) Correspondence; (2) University Papers; (3) American Humanist Association; (4) Publications

Date Acquired: 00/00/1975

Subjects: Dewey, John, 1859-1952, Education - Philosophy, Humanism - History - 20th century, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale. Center for Dewey Studies.

Languages: English

Scope and Contents of the Materials

The papers of educational philosopher George E. Axtelle reflect his teaching and research while at SIUC. In addition to spearheading the establishment of both the John Dewey Society and SIU's Center for Dewey Studies, Axtelle was an active member of the American Humanist Association. The bulk of the collection contains general correspondence from 1959-1966. His university papers, concerning his teaching activities, are dated from 1960 to 1965.  So is his work on the Dewey project. There is also material pertaining to the business affairs of the American Humanist Association from 1959 to 1965 containing considerable correspondence with Edwin Wilson, a leading figure within that association.

Biographical Note

George E. Axtelle, born in Texas on November 28, 1893, was an educational philosopher and founder of the Center for Dewey Studies at Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIUC).  He earned degrees from the University of Washington (B.S., 1923), the University of Hawaii (M.A., 1928), and the University of California (Ed. D., 1935).  From 1920 to 1924 he taught and was an administrator in a number of schools in Hawaii.  Axtelle then moved to Orlando, California, where he was principal of a junior high school for five years.  During World War II, Axtelle worked for the U.S. War Productions Board, and from 1945 to 1946 he was employed by the U.S. Office of Price Administration.

Because of Axtelle’s interest and experience in the field of education he became a professor at Northwestern University (1935-1942) and later at New York University (1946-1959) where he chaired the departments of History and Philosophy of Education.  He wrote numerous articles on educational philosophy for professional journals, and co-authored a book with Benne Raust, The Improvement of Practical Intelligence (1950).  He was also the founder and first editor of The Collected Works of John Dewey.  Axtelle served as president of the Mid-Atlantic States Philosophy of Education Society (1957-1959), was elected vice-chairman of the American Humanist Society (1959, 1961) and the New York Committee to Abolish Capital Punishment as well as chairman of the New York Liberal Party.

During his last years at NYU, Axtelle, along with Joseph Ratner and William Gruen, collaborated on an idea to develop an analytic concordance of the major philosophical terms in John Dewey’s writing.  It became clear, however, that without definitive editions of Dewey’s works, a concordance was not possible.  In 1959, Axtelle came to SIUC as a professor of education in the Department of Administration and Supervision, and as a part time professor in SIU’s College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.  A year later, he received a grant for a special research project, “The Complete Works of John Dewey,” for the purpose of editing and publishing Dewey’s complete writings, both published and unpublished.  In 1962, Axtelle became president of the executive committee of the John Dewey Society.  By 1971, the Dewey research project evolved into the Center for Dewey Studies, which is considered to be a major contributor to the history of American Philosophy.  The editions which resulted were unique in that they were the first collected editions of the writings of an American philosopher, and are still acclaimed for their scholarly textual edition.

From 1970 to 1971 Axtelle was affiliated with the United States International University, Elliot Campus, San Diego, California.  He died on August 1, 1974, in Orange, California.

Axtelle was both a humanist and a pragmatist.  He believed that education was a society’s most important social function, and worked toward a theory and practice of education, and of political and social democracy, which maintained shared humanistic ends with pragmatic problem solving.

Subject/Index Terms

Dewey, John, 1859-1952
Education - Philosophy
Humanism - History - 20th century
Southern Illinois University at Carbondale
Southern Illinois University at Carbondale. Center for Dewey Studies.

Administrative Information

Repository: Southern Illinois University Special Collections Research Center

Access Restrictions: Unrestricted access.

Use Restrictions: To quote in print, or otherwise reproduce in whole or in part in any publication, including on the World Wide Web, any material from this collection, the researcher must obtain permission from (1) the owner of the physical property and (2) the holder of the copyright.  Persons wishing to quote from this collection should consult Special Collections Research Center to determine copyright holders for information in this collection.  Reproduction of any item must contain the complete citation to the original.

Preferred Citation: [after identification of item(s)], George E. Axtelle Papers, Special Collections Research Center, Morris Library, Southern Illinois University Carbondale.


Box and Folder Listing


Browse by Series:

[Series 1: Correspondence, 1924-1972],
[Series 2: University Papers, 1938-1974],
[Series 3: American Humanist Association, 1958-1965],
[Series 4: Publications, 1925-1969],
[All]

Series 4: Publications, 1925-1969Add to your cart.
Journals, newsletters, and other printed material containing articles by George E. Axtelle.
Box 8Add to your cart.
Item 1: Participation: A Principle of Life and Learning, II, 1926Add to your cart.
Item 2: Dewey's Impact on American Education, 1961Add to your cart.
Item 3: John Dewey and the Concept of Democracy, 1939Add to your cart.
Item 4: A Bright Promise (Essay Review), 1967Add to your cart.
Item 5: Should Communists Teach in American Universities?, 1949Add to your cart.
Item 6: Book Review: John Dewey's Impressions of Soviet Russia and the Revolutionary World-Mexico-China-Turkey, 1965Add to your cart.
Item 7: Religion, Education and Culture, 1956Add to your cart.
Item 8: The Case for Basic Education in Phi Delta Kappan, 1960Add to your cart.
Item 9: Practical Strategies in Facing Fixed Attitudes, 1945Add to your cart.
Item 10: Could it be Sabotage, Dr. Rafferty?, 1969Add to your cart.
Item 11: Alfred North Whitehead and the Problem of Unity, 1969Add to your cart.
Item 12: The Schools of Our Fathers Good Enough for Our Sons?, 1952Add to your cart.
Item 13: The Teacher and the Future, 1925Add to your cart.
Item 14: A Socially Oriented Mathematics, 1937Add to your cart.
Item 15: What Shall Our Schools Teach as Patriotism?, 1935Add to your cart.
Item 16: The Role of the Arts in Education, 1937Add to your cart.
Item 17: Effectiveness as a Value Concept, 1956Add to your cart.
Item 18: Communism and Academic Freedom, 1949Add to your cart.
Item 19: Why Teach Science, 1950Add to your cart.
Item 20: Science, Morals, and Social Policy, 1960Add to your cart.
Item 21: William Heard Kilpatrick: An Interpretation, 1957Add to your cart.
Item 22: Common Sense, Philosophy and Education, 1936Add to your cart.
Item 23: John Dewey and the Concept of Democracy, 1939Add to your cart.
Item 24: The Junior High School: Its Features and Functions, 1925Add to your cart.
Item 25: VI: Operations of Practical Judgment in the Presence of Fixed Attitudes and Coercive Power, 1945Add to your cart.
Item 26: The Cultural Background of American Democracy, 1940Add to your cart.
Item 27: The Humanizing of Knowledge and the Education of Values, 1966Add to your cart.
Item 28: Book Review: Soviet Education, 1958Add to your cart.
Item 29: An Experimentalist View on Moral Education, 1966Add to your cart.
Item 30: Technology and Social Change, 1961Add to your cart.
Item 31: The Philosophy of Organism Applied to Democratic Theory and Strategy, 1951Add to your cart.
Item 32: Behind the Johnson Plan, 1938Add to your cart.
Item 33: Significance of the Inquiry into the Nature and Constancy of the I. Q., 1939Add to your cart.
Item 34: A Reply to the Bishops of the United States, 1956Add to your cart.
Item 35: Book Review: The Philosophy of John Dewey, 1940Add to your cart.
Item 36: Book Review: The Humanist Stake in Education, 1959Add to your cart.
Item 37: Science, Morals, and Social Policy, 1960Add to your cart.
Item 38: Philosophy in American Education, 1956Add to your cart.
Item 39: John Dewey's Concept of "The Religious", 1967Add to your cart.
Item 40: The Re-examination of Democratic Ideals and Institutions, 1949Add to your cart.
Item 41: The Rise of the Democratic Ideal in America, 1940Add to your cart.
Item 42: The Humanizing of Knowledge and the Education of Values, 1966Add to your cart.
Item 43: Teacher is Key to Success in Progressive Education, 1958Add to your cart.
Item 44: Problems of a Science of Education, 1936Add to your cart.
Item 45: Practical Strategies in Facing Fixed Attitudes, 1945Add to your cart.
Item 46: The Implications of the Philosophy of Experimentalism for Education, 1935Add to your cart.
George Axtelle's dissertation.

Browse by Series:

[Series 1: Correspondence, 1924-1972],
[Series 2: University Papers, 1938-1974],
[Series 3: American Humanist Association, 1958-1965],
[Series 4: Publications, 1925-1969],
[All]

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